Tag Archives: J.Z. Smith

Teaching Theory in the Introductory Classroom, Part 4

This is part of an ongoing series of posts in a collaborative effort between the Practicum: Critical Theory, Religion, and Pedagogy and the Bulletin for the Study of Religion blogs. On November 23, 2014, approximately 20 scholars of religion, from grad students to more … Continue reading

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Teaching Theory in the Introductory Classroom

This is another installment in an ongoing series of posts in a collaborative effort between the Practicum: Critical Theory, Religion, and Pedagogy and the Bulletin for the Study of Religion blogs. On November 23, 2014, approximately 20 scholars of religion, from … Continue reading

Posted in Pedagogy, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Teaching Theory in the Introductory Classroom, Part 1

This is part of an ongoing series of posts in a collaborative effort between the Practicum: Critical Theory, Religion, and Pedagogy and the Bulletin for the Study of Religion blogs. On November 23, 2014, approximately 20 scholars of religion, from … Continue reading

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Religion Clichés #5: Religious Past

by Tenzan Eaghll Note: This post is the third in a series that seeks to summarize some of the clichés associated with religion. It is framed as a critique of a 1972 article by Ninian Smart. For the two first posts … Continue reading

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Dead Religions

by Tenzan Eaghll Did you catch the 2008 interview with J.Z. Smith that was recently making the rounds on Facebook? In it, Smith suggests that the benefit of studying dead ancient religions is that they can’t talk back to you. When you … Continue reading

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Two Exorcisms: The Narrative Functions of Consecrated Space

by Joseph Laycock Last week, two reports of exorcism made the news. In Oklahoma City, Archbishop Paul S. Coakley exorcized the Civic Center Music Hall to reverse the effects of a recent black mass. Meanwhile in Liberia, self-styled bishop Edward … Continue reading

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Reflections on RELS 161: Contemporary Problems in Religion and Culture

by Ian Alexander Cuthbertson Note: This post originally appeared on the Practicum: Critical Theory, Religion, and Pedagogy blog. Last year I redesigned a first-year religious studies course at Queen’s University in Kingston Ontario. The course is one of two full-year … Continue reading

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