Tag Archives: Tibetan Buddhism

What’s in Your Religion Syllabus?: Sarah F. Haynes

In this new series with the Bulletin, we ask scholars of religion to share with our readers what’s in their religion syllabus, from a new class or a class they’ve taught for years, reflecting on what has worked, what has been … Continue reading

Posted in Buddhist Studies, Pedagogy, Politics and Religion, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Sexuality and Gender, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

So You’re Not a Priest? Scholars Explain What They Do to Outsiders: Adam Miller

In this series with the Bulletin, we ask scholars to talk about how they describe what they do to outsiders by sharing a story or two, and reflect on how this has affected their identity as scholars of religion. For other … Continue reading

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Offerings for the Loch Ness Monster—a Sign of Buddhism’s Arrival in the West

By Joseph P. Laycock and Natasha L. Mikles * This post now appears in expanded form in the Bulletin for the Study of Religion journal. While discussing construction of the upcoming Karma Kagyu Tibetan Buddhist practice center near Loch Ness, … Continue reading

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Semiotics and Subjectivity in the Tibetan Buddhist Sand Painting Ritual

By Tim Murphy What is this?  Among other things, it is a semiotic system that structures and defines subjectivity, experience, and agency.  If we read what we may call the “mandala situation” by means of the heuristic of semiotic theory, … Continue reading

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