Tag Archives: religious studies

Who Gets to Play in the Sandbox? Debating Identities, Methodologies, and Theoretical Frameworks

The following is the editorial introduction to the December 2015 issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion (the full table of contents having already been posted). We offer this editorial here on the blog in order to give … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Craig Martin, Editorial, Interviews, Ipsita Chatterjea, Joseph Laycock, Kate Daley-Bailey, Nathan Rein, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Now Published – Bulletin for the Study of Religion 44.4 (December 2015)

The December issue of the Bulletin has now been published and is available. Below is the table of contents of this issue, which includes an Open Letter to the AAR on the challenges facing adjunct/contingent faculty with regard to the … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Brad Stoddard, Craig Martin, Editorial, Interviews, Ipsita Chatterjea, Joseph Laycock, Kate Daley-Bailey, Nathan Rein, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Case of Auto-immunity: A Response to Philip L. Tite

by Karen Zoppa Note: This post is in response to Philip L. Tite’s short essay, “Editor’s Corner:  Critics or Caretakers? It’s All in the Mapping” Bulletin for the Study of Religion 44.3 (September 2015): 38-39. Philip Tite reflects on an important … Continue reading

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Genealogies of Religion, Twenty Years On: An Interview with Talal Asad

The following is part of an interview conducted by Craig Martin with Talal Asad, which appears in the February issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2014). To read the full interview, please follow … Continue reading

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Terrorism in Paris: Religious Violence and the Role of the Scholar of Religion

By Philip L. Tite This past weekend was marked by a horrific act of violence in Paris, leaving at least 129 people dead, hundreds more injured, and millions in shock and grief. Bombs and shootings throughout various parts of the … Continue reading

Posted in Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Violence, Religion, and the Death of René Girard

By Philip L. Tite On November 4, 2015 the renowned literary theorist, René Girard (Stanford University) passed away at the age of 91. In an online announcement on the Stanford News, Cynthia Haven offers a comprehensive and glowing overview of … Continue reading

Posted in Academy, Announcements, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Disruptive Narratives and the “Funny” in Religion

By Philip L. Tite In the most recent issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion, Catherine Caufield (Athabasca University) offers a fascinating analysis of several modern fictional accounts of the life of Jesus. She looks at Nikos Kanzantzakis’ … Continue reading

Posted in Joseph Laycock, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments