Tag Archives: Muhammad

Disruptive Narratives and the “Funny” in Religion

By Philip L. Tite In the most recent issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion, Catherine Caufield (Athabasca University) offers a fascinating analysis of several modern fictional accounts of the life of Jesus. She looks at Nikos Kanzantzakis’ … Continue reading

Posted in Joseph Laycock, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ode to Islamic Studies: Its Allure, Its Danger, Its Power

by Edward E. Curtis IV Editor’s note: This post is part of the Reflections on Islamic Studies series. By any measure, Islamic studies is a vibrant field. In the last several decades, the number of tenure-track positions dedicated to the study … Continue reading

Posted in Politics and Religion, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Taking Care of Jesus and Muhammad: Reflections on Islamic Studies

by James Crossley Editor’s note: This post is part of a broader conversation on scholarship in Islamic Studies that was sparked by two recent articles, one by Omid Safi and one by Aaron Hughes. Other articles in this series can be found here and here. … Continue reading

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Will it Ever Be “Just about Bad Scholarship?”: A Response to Aaron Hughes and Omid Safi

by Carl J. Stoneham As a PhD student in a U.S. Religious Studies program (now entering the dissertation phase), I am struck by the ‘emic–etic tension’ in the field of Islamic Studies. While hashing out the particulars of the debate … Continue reading

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When Bad Scholarship Is Just Bad Scholarship: A Response to Omid Safi

by Aaron W. Hughes I’ve never been called a racist before. Yet, if Omid Safi’s undocumented musings about the current state of Islamic Studies is to be believed, I am one of several non-Muslims who have the nerve to attack and critique … Continue reading

Posted in Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 27 Comments

Pluralism and the Outrage in Libya and Egypt

By Steven Ramey The deadly attack in Benghazi and protests in Cairo on September 11, 2012, reportedly over a video depiction of Muhammad produced in the United States, suggest a common understanding of the category “religion” between protestors and the … Continue reading

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