Tag Archives: Buddhism

What’s in Your Religion Syllabus?: Sarah F. Haynes

In this new series with the Bulletin, we ask scholars of religion to share with our readers what’s in their religion syllabus, from a new class or a class they’ve taught for years, reflecting on what has worked, what has been … Continue reading

Posted in Buddhist Studies, Pedagogy, Politics and Religion, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Sexuality and Gender, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Offerings for the Loch Ness Monster—a Sign of Buddhism’s Arrival in the West

By Joseph P. Laycock and Natasha L. Mikles * This post now appears in expanded form in the Bulletin for the Study of Religion journal. While discussing construction of the upcoming Karma Kagyu Tibetan Buddhist practice center near Loch Ness, … Continue reading

Posted in Joseph Laycock, Natasha Mikles, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion in the News, South Asian Studies, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Debating a Discipline, Contesting Identities, and the Future of Islamic Studies

The following is the editorial introduction to the November 2014 issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion (the full table of contents having already been posted). We offer this editorial here on the blog in order to give … Continue reading

Posted in Academy, Announcements, Editorial, Joseph Laycock, Matt Sheedy, Natasha Mikles, Philip L. Tite, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Now Published – Bulletin for the Study of Religion 43.4 (November 2014)

The November issue of the Bulletin has been published and is available. Below is the table of contents of this issue, which includes a panel of papers on the current state and future of Islamic studies with contributors building on … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Joseph Laycock, Matt Sheedy, Natasha Mikles, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory & Religion Series, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reflexive Religious Studies: A Note

Jason Ānanda Josephson * This post originally appeared on the author’s blog. I’ve been lecturing about and, even calling for, what I term “Reflexive Religious Studies” for some time. My comments about it will be appearing in print in the … Continue reading

Posted in Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Definitive Descriptions in the Study of Religion and the Doniger Controversy

by Steven Ramey The responses to Wendy Doniger’s book, The Hindus: An Alternative History, whose publisher (Penguin, India) is withdrawing the book in India to settle a criminal lawsuit over offending religious sentiments, raise a whole host of issues. Scholars … Continue reading

Posted in Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, South Asian Studies, Steven Ramey, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Considering Orgasmic Meditation: It’s not ‘Diddling’ when it’s a Ritual

by Natasha L. Mikles While perusing the blogs recently, I came across an article describing one woman’s visit to the San Francisco OMXperience—a three-day, $795-a-head event in August 2013 designed to “kick off the industry of the orgasm”—an industry of … Continue reading

Posted in Natasha Mikles, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment