Category Archives: South Asian Studies

Feeling Rules and the Construction of Sacred Space

by Adam Miller I don’t often think in terms of affect, but I’ve talked enough with Danae Faulk to be mildly familiar with the perspective/vocabulary. (Donovan Schaefer has also given me much to think with in this regard, though I wrote what … Continue reading

Posted in Buddhist Studies, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Unnatural Groups and Protests in India

by Steven Ramey Note: This post originally appeared on the Studying Religion in Culture blog at the University of Alabama. Group identifications are not something inherent or automatic; they require work to construct and maintain, and that work only makes … Continue reading

Posted in Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Zombie Attack: Karen Armstrong does Calvin

by Richard K. Payne Note: This post originally appeared on the author’s blog. In the world according to Paul Krugman there are some ideas that just won’t die no matter how often refuted: hence zombies. Perennialism, the claim that all … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Contributor, Politics and Religion, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Theory and Method, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“Common Sense” in the Inquiry of Ugra

by Adam Miller Note: This post originally appeared on the author’s blog. While reading Jan Nattier’s translation of The Inquiry of Ugra (Skt. Ugraparipṛcchā), a work most all scholars associate with the early Mahāyāna, I came across three apparently common sayings in the turn-of-the-Common-Era Buddhist world (Nattier calls them “well-known sayings”). … Continue reading

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Religious Proximity and Cultural Distance: An Introduction on the East/West Dichotomy

The following is the editorial introduction to the June 2015 issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion (the full table of contents having already been posted). We offer this editorial here on the blog in order to give … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Editorial, James Dennis LoRusso, Matt Sheedy, NAASR Notes, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Now Published – Bulletin for the Study of Religion 44.2 (June 2015)

The June issue of the Bulletin has been published and is available. Below is the table of contents of this issue, which includes a panel of papers on the construction of “East/West” in the study of religion. This debate began … Continue reading

Posted in Academy, Announcements, James Dennis LoRusso, Matt Sheedy, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Southeast Asian Studies, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

God©

By Deeksha Sivakumar Religion has always provided a reliable and recognizable brand name in the realm of the market where choices are too many. This is especially so in India, where Hindu gods have more celebrity appeal than any movie … Continue reading

Posted in Deeksha Sivakumar, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, South Asian Studies, Theory in the Real World, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment