Category Archives: Joseph Laycock

Who Gets to Play in the Sandbox? Debating Identities, Methodologies, and Theoretical Frameworks

The following is the editorial introduction to the December 2015 issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion (the full table of contents having already been posted). We offer this editorial here on the blog in order to give … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Craig Martin, Editorial, Interviews, Ipsita Chatterjea, Joseph Laycock, Kate Daley-Bailey, Nathan Rein, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Now Published – Bulletin for the Study of Religion 44.4 (December 2015)

The December issue of the Bulletin has now been published and is available. Below is the table of contents of this issue, which includes an Open Letter to the AAR on the challenges facing adjunct/contingent faculty with regard to the … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, Brad Stoddard, Craig Martin, Editorial, Interviews, Ipsita Chatterjea, Joseph Laycock, Kate Daley-Bailey, Nathan Rein, Pedagogy, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Disruptive Narratives and the “Funny” in Religion

By Philip L. Tite In the most recent issue of the Bulletin for the Study of Religion, Catherine Caufield (Athabasca University) offers a fascinating analysis of several modern fictional accounts of the life of Jesus. She looks at Nikos Kanzantzakis’ … Continue reading

Posted in Joseph Laycock, Philip L. Tite, Politics and Religion, Reflections on Islamic Studies, Religion and Popular Culture, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Theory and Method, Theory in the Real World | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Who Stands with Ahmed and Why?

In this past Monday’s post, Joseph Laycock discusses the Ahmed Mohamed affair–the 14-year old Texas boy arrested for bringing a clock to school, mistaken for a bomb, despite a clear lack of evidence–and asks whether it is “necessary to believe … Continue reading

Posted in Joseph Laycock, Matt Sheedy, Politics and Religion, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Religion in the News, Theory and Method | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Who Believed There Was A Bomb and When Did They Believe It? What Ahmed Mohamed’s Clock Says About Belief and Moral Panic

by Joseph Laycock Thousands have expressed outrage over the treatment of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old Muslim student at MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas, who was arrested after trying to show his English teacher an electronic clock he had constructed. … Continue reading

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Create Your Own Religion (Out of Someone Else’s): A Class Exercise

by Jospeh Laycock This semester I had the pleasure of conducting a grand experiment with my students that I have wanted to do for several years. My class ran a simulation in which we created eleven imaginary religious traditions and … Continue reading

Posted in Joseph Laycock, Pedagogy, Religion and Society, Religion and Theory, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Offerings for the Loch Ness Monster—a Sign of Buddhism’s Arrival in the West

By Joseph P. Laycock and Natasha L. Mikles * This post now appears in expanded form in the Bulletin for the Study of Religion journal. While discussing construction of the upcoming Karma Kagyu Tibetan Buddhist practice center near Loch Ness, … Continue reading

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