Monthly Archives: July 2013

“The Zombies Are Coming!” An Interview with Kelly J. Baker on the Zombie Apocalypse

By Philip L. Tite Recently, our colleague here at the Bulletin, Kelly Baker, published a short ebook entitled, The Zombies Are Coming! The Realities of the Zombie Apocalypse in American Culture (Bondfire Books, 2013). In this readable and engaging book, … Continue reading

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A Response to “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications, and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies”

* This post is one of several responses to Kelly J. Baker’s essay “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies,” which can be found here, here, here, here and here. by Rebecca Barrett-Fox We don’t ask oncologists if they agree … Continue reading

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Category Formations and “Eastern” Traditions: Summary

by Matt Sheedy The following is a summary of the third instalment of the Critical Questions Series dealing with category formation in “Eastern” traditions. Though the authors approach this question in a variety of ways, each is informed in their … Continue reading

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A Response to “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications, and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies”

* This post is one of several responses to Kelly J. Baker’s essay “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies,” which can be found here, here, here and here. (Inspiration: The Lamentations of the Scholar of the “Illegitimate”) Anthony … Continue reading

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A Response to “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications, and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies”

* This post is one of several responses to Kelly J. Baker’s essay “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies,” which can be found here, here and here. by Rachel McBride Lindsey In the middle of the nineteenth … Continue reading

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A Response to “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications, and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies”

* This post is one of several responses to Kelly J. Baker’s essay “Evidentiary Boundaries and Improper Interventions: Evidence, Implications and Illegitimacy in American Religious Studies,” which can be found here and here. by Charlie McCrary “Awakening, as we have, to a new religious … Continue reading

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The Fox and the Trap: A Lesson From Hannah Arendt on Theory

by Tenzan Eaghll In 1953, Hannah Arendt wrote an allegorical critique of Heidegger called “Heidegger the fox.” In this allegory, Arendt points out the danger of becoming trapped in a theoretical construction: Once upon a time there was a fox … Continue reading

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